Andrée A Michaud ‘Bondrée’


—The children had long since been put to bed when Zaza Mulligan, on Friday the 21st of July, started up the forest path leading to her parents chalet humming Aimg_0860 Whitet Shade of Pale driven on by Procul Harum alongside Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds in the sparkling lights of the summer of 67. She’d drunken too much but she didn’t care.***


Welcome to Boundary Pond, a lake on the Quebec, Maine border, which picked up the name of Bondrée from Pierre Landry a long since dead trapper. In this book about the great out doors around the lake and its surrounding forest, Peter’s forest, Michaud manages the feat of presenting us with a closed set up mystery. At the outset of the story Zaza Mulligan is found dead after having her leg sectioned in one of Pierre Landry’s old bear traps, and after investigation by the American detective Stan Michaud the enquiry returns an accidental death but Michaud has his doubts:


—Life reorganized itself around this absence and everyone, except for friends and family as well as cops like himself, unable to hold back the ghosts, would forget that in this space, filled by absence, there was once a young girl. It had to be so, the game didn’t allow the participation of the deceased.***


And then the second death in similar circumstances leaves no doubt, there is a killer out there. Michaud shows us the tired and haunted detective, The mix of holiday makers around the lake, part American and part Québécois, only managing a few words of each other’s language as well as several chapters narrated by the young Andrée Duchamp, no longer a child but not yet an adolescent:


—I’d only seen my mother in such a state at the death of her father grand-dad Fred. For weeks after papys funeral, she just disappeared at any time. Her body was still there bent over the sink or over the kitchen counter, but the essence of my mother was gone. Her hands hung in the air in front of her, our questions slid from her ears and it needed for her to drop her knife or her potato for her to re-enter her body. These absences scared me, because the false grimace that froze her looks belonged to a stranger that I wouldn’t have wanted to cross in the dark.***


And who is Little Hawk, an erstwhile friend of, and who had been taught more than twenty years previously to trap by, Pierre Landry and who finding Landry hung in his hut swore that:


—Nobody, ever, will touch my son, my daughter, my father or my brother.***


Michaud, who manages to have a detective with her surname and a narrator with her christian name, much like Agatha Christie before her, even though we know all of the families around the lake, keeps us guessing till the end.

First published in French as ‘Bondrée’ by Les Éditions Québec Amérique in 2013
Translated into English by Donald Winkler as “Boundary” and published by No Exit Press in 2017
*** My translation

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Olivier Norek ‘Code 93’

—Four endless grey lanes piercing like a lance through to the heart of the suburb. Gradually the houses becoming flats, the flats becoming tower blocks. Look the other way at the gypsy camps. Caravans as far as the eye can see, one up against another along the RER lines.IMG_1105 Washing left to dry on the railings surrounding this section of the population we can neither like nor hate. Close the window as you pass the waste disposal site and its smells, only a short distance from the housing. This is how the ’93’ and its citizens are treated, going as far as to pile mountains of bins next to their homes. Just an idea, maybe we should propose to do this to the capital city, the other side of the périphérique, just to see how the Parisiens react. Unless of course the poor and the immigrants have a less developed sense of smell.***

Olivier Norek, an ex-police detective takes us here on a trip to surroundings he knows well, the 93 pronounced ‘nine- three’ the poorest of the départements immediately surrounding the city of Paris described with a few strokes of the brush in my opening quote.

The story is an inventive and largely believable story of solidarity in a police team amidst political and police corruption and feelings of entitlement. Crime statistics are being ‘massaged’ by making murder cases of marginal victims disappear. This  practice is forced to the light of day by a sadistic murderer who sets his sights on just such victims but ensures by his staging of the corpses that the cases cannot be hidden.

Why would anyone want to massage the crime figures in a notoriously dangerous département? Who could actually do this and how? What could be the killers motives and how does he choose his victims? Norek provides viable and intriguing answers to all of these questions.

A well written, lively police mystery, the main character, Coste, feels real, well worth a translation and, I believe, a filmed version!

First Published in French as “Code 93” in 2013 by Michel Lafon
*** My translation

Michel Bussi ‘Omaha Crimes’

This is Bussi’s first book (pre dating Black Waterlilies and After the Crash both published in English) originally written 20 years ago and recently republished, his twisted story lines were already in place, the premise the story is built on, a D-day story which leads to a string of events over France and the USA including disappearances, suicide, accidents, greed, deception and murder over a 45 year period, is original.

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On the 6th June 1944, a troop of 178 rangers have the task of landing on the beach then one at a time carrying explosives in open machine gun fire to breach a wall before getting to the bottom of the cliffs, they estimate that the first 30 rangers at least will die in the attempt and decide to draw lots to decide their order of assault. The rich Oscar Arlington who draws the number 4 begs to swap his number for another against a large sum of money which subsequently is never paid (maybe).

an enjoyable read including however, one or two points which the writer would handle differently today such as the relationship between Alice and her private detective.

First published in French as ‘Omaha Crimes’ by PTC (company since dissolved) in 2007.
Republished in French by Les Presses de la Cité as ‘Gravé dans le Sable’ in 2014